Tag Archives: babies

The Kilimanjaro Rock Event

It’s all confirmed! The rock event of the year will take place in The Gypsy Rose Rock and Blues Bar on Friday 24th February.

It’s looking like it’s going to be a fantastic night featuring some excellent Irish rock bands including The DC Experiment and Big September and acoustic sets by Derek Flynn and The Fendermen and even some comedy squeezed in too.

Tickets cost €10 and will be available at the door on the night. They can also be prebooked from tickets.ie from early next week. Doors open 7.30pm. There will be a raffle on the night with loads of excellent prizes including a weekend break away for two.

All funds raised on the night will go towards the target amount for my Climb for Prem Babies.

It’s promising to be a great evening for anyone with rock music in their soul and it really is for a great cause so please come along and don’t forget to invite your friends because ultimately it’ll be the crowd that will make it a night to remember. Please share, like and retweet this to death too.

I’d like to take this opportunity to offer a huge thank you to all the artists who are giving their time and talents to be part of this and to our hosts at The Gypsy Rose.

Update 13 February 2012
As if we didn’t have enough already, I’m delighted to add The Kartels and Machine Gun Baby (MGB) to the line up at the event. I’m getting very excited about it now – hope you can all come along. Tickets are now available from Tickets.ie

The Only Way is Up

Just a quick update on how things are going:

Fundraising:
Thanks to two healthy donations this weekend my current fundraising total is at €1200. This is almost a quarter of the way there. I really appreciate all donations that have been made so far. It’s starting to look like I might actually do it 🙂

The line-up for the fundraising gig should be confirmed over the next day or two. Watch this space. There’ll be a Mad Hatter’s Tea Party for kiddies in March. I’m hoping to get a Saturday of bag packing in a grocery store and sell everything I own at a car boot sale. All volunteers welcome. Especially with the bag packing, not many bags can one woman pack.Some very kind people are also running marathons and holding coffee mornings on my behalf. Every Euro counts too so please keep the donations coming at Jenny Climbs Kili

Training:
I can walk miles now. I’ve been walking most days around the rather flat Dublin 15 and working out the others with an aerobic/resistance DVD. This weekend we climbed The Sugarloaf in Wicklow which was surprisingly easy. You should try it. I was sorry I didn’t take my kids. They would have loved it. We made it up and down in under two hours and I still had the energy to go grocery shopping afterwards.

I was also convinced to confront my trepidation of heights by jumping off a tower onto a zipline at Rathbeggan Lakes All in all I’m learning a lot through this challenge. I’ve learned that I hate asking people for money and favours but when I actually get up the guts to do it people are surprisingly generous. I’ve learned that many members of the music industry prefer to conduct their business between the hours of midnight and 3am. I’ve learned that if you jump off a building with a rope attached to you there’s a good chance you won’t hit the ground and most eye-opening to me is that I’ve learned that any mountain can be climbed if you just keep going one step at a time. I still have the tallest one to put that theory to the test though 🙂

Again, thank you all so much for your support. I and the charity Irish Premature Babies are very very grateful.

Keeping parents and babies together.

A few years ago at a La Leche League conference I had the privilege of hearing Dr Nils Bergman speak. In his talk he outlined the history of incubators and spoke of how they began as Dr. Martin Couney’s “Incubator Baby Exhibits” in a freakshow in Coney Island. He spoke of his clinic and his research in Third World countries and the amazing outcomes of Kangaroo Mother care as opposed to Western incubators. He described how simply being against their mothers’ chests stabilised babies’ heartrates, breathing, and temperature – babies born as prematurely as 24 weeks. More on this research can be found on the Irish Premature Babies site.

Some of the images and what seemed to me radical ideas in his presentation never left me. One statement stayed with me too. ‘In no published paper is a single adverse outcome reported for Kangaroo Mother Care’ Then I began to listen to the parents of premature babies in Ireland. Time and time again I heard ‘I was discharged but baby was kept in for weeks.’ This just feels wrong to me. I have been blessed with two full term healthy babies and the physical need to have them constantly close to me in those early weeks was overpowering. I discovered that in Ireland there are currently not enough facilities to keep parents close to their premature infants. Instead, mothers are sent home with an industrial electric breastpump and a photo. All of Ireland’s neo natal intensive care units are in Dublin. Many parents have travelled for hours everyday to be with their sick babies, some have slept in their cars. Others have sold all their valuables to pay for private accommodation. This is a very sad situation that I would love to be able to wave a magic wand and change.

Unfortunately, I don’t possess a working magic wand but when I saw that the charity CHY19532 Irish Premature Babies was organising a group to climb Mt Kilimanjaro to raise funds to address this situation and also to raise awareness of the problem, I jumped on board. It will be a hard slog up that mountain but nothing compared to the hard slog our tiniest babies have to simply survive and their parents have just to cope. Please support my climb by donating here or through the buttons on the right of this post. All donations are much appreciated. You can also sign a petition to increase awareness of the problem here. I would also like to say a huge thank you to everyone who has donated so far and supported me by offering their time and by sharing this blog.